What is the cost of whole house battery backup in 2024? - SHIELDEN

What is the cost of whole house battery backup in 2024?

Have you ever experienced a power outage that disrupted your daily life and activities? Have you ever wondered how to keep your home running smoothly and safely even when the grid fails? If you answered yes to any of these questions, then you might be interested in learning more about whole house battery backup systems.

Whole house battery backup systems are devices that store excess electricity from the grid or renewable sources and provide it to your home when needed. As long-term energy storage they can power your essential appliances and devices, such as lights, refrigerators, computers, and security systems, during a blackout or a natural disaster. They can also help you save money on your electricity bills by reducing your dependence on the grid and allowing you to use cheaper or cleaner energy sources.

According to a report by Grand View Research, the global market for residential battery storage systems is expected to grow at a compound annual growth rate (CAGR) of 19.7% from 2020 to 2027, reaching $19.2 billion by 2027. The increasing demand for reliable and resilient power supply, the rising adoption of renewable energy, and the declining cost of batteries are some of the key drivers for this growth.

In this blog post, we will explore the cost of whole house battery backup energy storage systems in 2024, and what factors affect it. We will also compare some of the best systems available in the market and provide some tips for choosing the right one for your home. By the end of this post, you will have a better understanding of the benefits and challenges of whole house battery backup systems, and how to make an informed decision for your home energy needs.

A whole house battery backup system installed in a garage

Factors affecting the cost of whole house battery backup systems

The cost of whole house battery backup systems can vary widely depending on several factors, such as battery size and power capacity, installation and maintenance, generating electricity during a blackout, battery type, charging options, and electricity generation. Let’s take a closer look at each of these factors and how they influence the system’s cost.

Battery size and power capacity

One of the most important factors that affect the cost of whole house battery backup systems is the battery size and power capacity. The battery size refers to the amount of energy that the battery can store, measured in kilowatt-hours (kWh). The power capacity refers to the amount of power that the battery can deliver at any given time, measured in kilowatts (kW).

The battery size and power capacity determine how long and how much electricity the system can provide to your home during a power outage. The larger the battery size and power capacity, the longer and more powerful the backup. However, the larger the battery size and power capacity, the higher the cost of the system.

According to EnergySage, a leading online marketplace for solar and battery solutions, the average cost of a home battery energy storage system in the US in 2020 was $1,200 per kWh. This means that a 10 kWh battery system would cost around $12,000, while a 20 kWh battery system would cost around $24,000. However, these costs are expected to decline in the future, as battery technology improves and economies of scale are achieved.

Some examples of different battery sizes and power capacities and their corresponding costs are:

  • Tesla Powerwall +: 13.5 kWh, 5 kW, $7,500
  • EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2: 25 kWh, 6.6 kW, $12,999
  • Generac PWRcell: 18 kWh, 9 kW, $15,000
  • Enphase IQ Battery 10T: 10 kWh, 3.84 kW, $6,000

Installation and maintenance

Another factor that affects the cost of whole house battery backup systems is the installation and maintenance. The installation and maintenance costs vary depending on the complexity, labor, and location of the installation. The installation and maintenance costs also include the cost of permits, inspections, wiring, and other components that are required to connect the system to your home and the grid.

The installation and maintenance costs can range from 10% to 50% of the total system cost, depending on the system and the installer. For example, a 10 kWh battery system that costs $10,000 could have an installation and maintenance cost of $1,000 to $5,000, bringing the total system cost to $11,000 to $15,000.

Some examples of different installation and maintenance scenarios and their corresponding costs are:

  • Tesla Powerwall +: The installation cost of Tesla Powerwall + is estimated to be between $3,000 and $4,500, depending on the number of units, the location, and the complexity of the installation. The maintenance cost of Tesla Powerwall + is minimal, as the system has a 10-year warranty that covers any defects or malfunctions.
  • EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2: The installation cost of EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2 is estimated to be between $1,500 and $2,500, depending on the number of units, the location, and the complexity of the installation. The maintenance cost of EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2 is also minimal, as the system has a 10-year warranty that covers any defects or malfunctions.
  • Generac PWRcell: The installation cost of Generac PWRcell is estimated to be between $4,000 and $6,000, depending on the number of units, the location, and the complexity of the installation. The maintenance cost of Generac PWRcell is moderate, as the system has a 10-year warranty that covers any defects or malfunctions, but also requires periodic inspections and service by a certified technician.
  • Enphase IQ Battery 10T: The installation cost of Enphase IQ Battery 10T is estimated to be between $2,000 and $3,000, depending on the number of units, the location, and the complexity of the installation. The maintenance cost of Enphase IQ Battery 10T is minimal, as the system has a 10-year warranty that covers any defects or malfunctions.

Generating electricity during a blackout

Another factor that affects the cost of whole house battery backup systems is the ability to generate electricity during a blackout. Some systems can generate electricity using solar panels or other renewable sources during a blackout, while others can only use the stored electricity from the battery. This feature can increase the initial cost of the system, but also provide long-term savings and environmental benefits.

The ability to generate electricity during a blackout can reduce your dependence on the grid and lower your electricity bills, as you can use the excess electricity from the solar panels or other sources to charge the battery or sell it back to the grid. It can also reduce your carbon footprint and greenhouse gas emissions, as you can use cleaner and greener energy sources.

The cost of generating electricity during a blackout depends on the type and size of the renewable energy system that you choose to pair with your battery system. According to EnergySage, the average cost of a residential solar system in the US in 2020 was $2.91 per watt. This means that a 5 kW solar system would cost around $14,550, while a 10 kW solar system would cost around $29,100. However, these costs are expected to decline in the future, as solar technology improves and incentives are available.

Some examples of different systems with the ability to generate electricity during a blackout and their corresponding costs are:

  • Tesla Powerwall +: Tesla Powerwall + can be paired with Tesla Solar Roof or Tesla Solar Panels to generate electricity during a blackout. The cost of Tesla Solar Roof is estimated to be between $21.85 and $31.35 per square foot, depending on the roof size, design, and location. The cost of Tesla Solar Panels is estimated to be between $2.01 and $2.53 per watt, depending on the system size, design, and location.
  • EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2: EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2 can be paired with EcoFlow Solar Panels or other compatible solar panels to generate electricity during a blackout. The cost of EcoFlow Solar Panels is estimated to be between $1,199 and $1,599 per unit, depending on the panel size and power output.
  • Generac PWRcell: Generac PWRcell can be paired with Generac PWRview Solar or other compatible solar panels to generate electricity during a blackout. The cost of Generac PWRview Solar is estimated to be between $2.40 and $3.
  • Enphase IQ Battery 10T: Enphase IQ Battery 10T can be paired with Enphase IQ Microinverters or other compatible solar panels to generate electricity during a blackout. The cost of Enphase IQ Microinverters is estimated to be between $1.10 and $1.40 per watt, depending on the system size, design, and location.

A solar panel and a battery system on a rooftop

Battery type

Another factor that affects the cost of whole house battery backup systems is the battery type. Different types of batteries, such as lead-acid, lithium-ion, or flow batteries, have different characteristics and performance. Battery type affects the system’s cost, lifespan, efficiency, and safety.

Lead-acid batteries are the oldest and most common type of batteries, used in cars, boats, and motorcycles. They are cheap, reliable, and easy to recycle, but they also have low energy density, short lifespan, low efficiency, and high maintenance. Lead-acid batteries are not suitable for whole house battery backup systems, as they cannot handle frequent and deep cycles, and they pose environmental and health risks.

Lithium-ion batteries are the most popular and advanced type of batteries, used in smartphones, laptops, and electric vehicles. They are expensive, lightweight, and compact, but they also have high energy density, long lifespan, high efficiency, and low maintenance. Lithium-ion batteries are ideal for whole house battery backup systems, as they can handle frequent and deep cycles, and they have high performance and safety standards.

Flow batteries are a new and emerging type of batteries, used in large-scale and industrial applications. They are modular, scalable, and flexible, but they also have low energy density, high installation cost, and complex operation. Flow batteries are promising for whole house battery backup systems, as they can store large amounts of energy for long periods of time, and they have long lifespan and high efficiency.

Some examples of different battery types and their corresponding costs are:

  • Tesla Powerwall +: Tesla Powerwall + uses lithium-ion batteries, which have a cost of around $556 per kWh, according to a report by BloombergNEF. The system has a lifespan of 10 years or 37.8 MWh of energy, whichever comes first, and an efficiency of 90%.
  • EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2: EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2 uses lithium-ion batteries, which have a cost of around $520 per kWh, according to the company’s website. The system has a lifespan of 10 years or 800 cycles, whichever comes first, and an efficiency of 95%.
  • Generac PWRcell: Generac PWRcell uses lithium-ion batteries, which have a cost of around $833 per kWh, according to a report by Solar Reviews. The system has a lifespan of 10 years or 4,000 cycles, whichever comes first, and an efficiency of 96%.
  • Enphase IQ Battery 10T: Enphase IQ Battery 10T uses lithium iron phosphate (LFP) batteries, which are a subtype of lithium-ion batteries, which have a cost of around $600 per kWh, according to a report by Solar Power World. The system has a lifespan of 10 years or 4,000 cycles, whichever comes first, and an efficiency of 96%.

Different types of batteries

Charging options

Another factor that affects the cost of whole house battery backup systems is the charging options. Different charging options, such as grid-tied, off-grid, or hybrid, have different advantages and disadvantages. Charging options affect the system’s cost, reliability, and flexibility.

Grid-tied systems are connected to the grid and use the grid as the primary source of electricity. They can charge the battery from the grid or from renewable sources, and they can sell the excess electricity back to the grid. Grid-tied systems are cheaper, simpler, and more reliable, but they also depend on the grid and cannot operate during a blackout.

Off-grid systems are not connected to the grid and use renewable sources as the primary source of electricity. They can charge the battery from renewable sources, and they can use the battery as the backup. Off-grid systems are more expensive, complex, and independent, but they also require more battery capacity and management, and they cannot sell the excess electricity to the grid.

Hybrid systems are connected to the grid and use both the grid and renewable sources as sources of electricity. They can charge the battery from the grid or from renewable sources, and they can sell the excess electricity back to the grid. They can also operate during a blackout, using the battery or the renewable sources as the backup. Hybrid systems are more flexible, efficient, and resilient, but they also require more components and controls, and they are subject to grid regulations and fees.

Some examples of different charging options and their corresponding costs are:

  • Tesla Powerwall +: Tesla Powerwall + can be configured as a grid-tied, off-grid, or hybrid system, depending on the customer’s preference and location. The cost of the charging option depends on the number of Powerwalls, the type and size of the solar system, and the local utility rates and incentives.
  • EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2: EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2 can be configured as a grid-tied, off-grid, or hybrid system, depending on the customer’s preference and location. The cost of the charging option depends on the number of DELTAs, the type and size of the solar system, and the local utility rates and incentives.
  • Generac PWRcell: Generac PWRcell can be configured as a grid-tied or hybrid system, depending on the customer’s preference and location. The cost of the charging option depends on the number of PWRcells, the type and size of the solar system, and the local utility rates and incentives.
  • Enphase IQ Battery 10T: Enphase IQ Battery 10T can be configured as a grid-tied or hybrid system, depending on the customer’s preference and location. The cost of the charging option depends on the number of IQ Batteries, the type and size of the solar system, and the local utility rates and incentives.

A diagram showing different charging options

Electricity generation

Another factor that affects the cost of whole house battery backup systems is the electricity generation. Different electricity generation methods, such as solar, wind, or hydro, have different environmental and economic impacts. Electricity generation affects the system’s cost, sustainability, and independence.

Solar energy is the most common and popular method of electricity generation for whole house battery backup systems. Solar energy is clean, renewable, and abundant, but it also depends on the weather, the season, and the location. Solar energy can reduce the system’s cost, as it can provide free and unlimited electricity, but it can also increase the system’s cost, as it requires solar panels, inverters, and other components.

Wind energy is another method of electricity generation for whole house battery backup systems. Wind energy is clean, renewable, and abundant, but it also depends on the wind speed, the direction, and the location. Wind energy can reduce the system’s cost, as it can provide free and unlimited electricity, but it can also increase the system’s cost, as it requires wind turbines, generators, and other components.

Hydro energy is another method of electricity generation for whole house battery backup systems. Hydro energy is clean, renewable, and abundant, but it also depends on the water flow, the elevation, and the location. Hydro energy can reduce the system’s cost, as it can provide free and unlimited electricity, but it can also increase the system’s cost, as it requires dams, pipes, and other components.

Some examples of different electricity generation methods and their corresponding costs are:

  • Tesla Powerwall +: Tesla Powerwall + can use solar energy, wind energy, or hydro energy as the method of electricity generation, depending on the customer’s preference and availability. The cost of the system varies depending on the method, but it is estimated to be between $2 and $4 per watt, including installation and battery.
  • EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2: EcoFlow DELTA Pro Ultra & Smart Home Panel 2 can use solar energy, wind energy, or hydro energy as the method of electricity generation, depending on the customer’s preference and availability. The cost of the system varies depending on the method, but it is estimated to be between $1.5 and $3 per watt, including installation and battery.
  • Generac PWRcell: Generac PWRcell can use solar energy or wind energy as the method of electricity generation, depending on the customer’s preference and availability. The cost of the system varies depending on the method, but it is estimated to be between $3 and $5 per watt, including installation and battery.
  • Enphase IQ Battery 10T: Enphase IQ Battery 10T can use solar energy as the method of electricity generation, depending on the customer’s preference and availability. The cost of the system varies depending on the method, but it is estimated to be between $2.5 and $4 per watt, including installation and battery.

Different electricity generation methods

Conclusion

In this blog post, we have explored the cost of whole house battery backup systems in 2024, and what factors affect it. We have learned that the cost of whole house battery backup systems can vary widely depending on several factors, such as battery size and power capacity, installation and maintenance, generating electricity during a blackout, battery type, charging options, and electricity generation. We have also compared some of the best systems available in the market and provided some tips for choosing the right one for your home.

We hope that this blog post has given you a better understanding of the benefits and challenges of whole house battery backup systems, and how to make an informed decision for your home energy needs. If you are interested in learning more about whole house battery backup systems, or if you want to purchase one for your home, please visit our website and check out our products and services. We offer high-quality and affordable home battery backup power supply that can meet your specific needs and preferences. We also offer free consultation, installation, and maintenance services for our customers.

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